Weaving Web 2.0

Learning about the latest technology in Module 3, Weaving Web 2.0, introduced us to what is available and hinted at what could be. My favorite description of Web 2.0 comes from the Bryan Alexander article: “Ultimately, the LABEL Web 2.0 is far less important than the CONCEPTS, PROJECTS, and PRACTICES, included in its scope”. This reminds me of William Faulkner replying to a reporter asking about the significance of the rose in his short story, “A Rose for Emily”, “…sometimes a rose is just a rose.” Web 2.0 is a thing, a word, the environment that is created under this label is:

1. interpersonal computing (connecting people in online settings with chat, social media, work teams, videos)
2. various web services (social media [Facebook, FaceTime, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, blogs, etc.)
3. using software as a service (online banking, PayPal, etc.)

Web 2.0 has made life easier in many aspects. It has allowed me to work out of my home for the past 20 years and remain in contact nearly as easily as if I kept a cubicle next to my boss. It has allowed me to begin and maintain contact with my students in ways I never could. When I began my training position I had a pager. When a student would page me I would have to pull off the road, find a pay phone, return the call, get information, plan follow up. Now I can receive an email, text, message, video call, see the context of the request, and reply immediately or as needed.  Webinars have allowed me to reach my students before and after class. I’ve even had special speakers “webinar-in” to a class and have shown videos before, during, and after class.

As I age (and, hopefully, grow wiser as a trainer) my students become younger. Knowing and responding to their communication preferences has been easier with Web 2.0 applications. I’ve held Facebook discussions, learning minutes via video, live webinar sessions on-the-fly to help students, talked on the phone (less and less as time goes by) and, still, commune face-to-face (the BEST way I still feel).

Web 2.0 items such as “CoggleIt” ( http://www.coggleit.com) have provided collaborative opportunities for fast feedback and long-range planning.  The asynchronous abilities of

Web 2.0 tools have made the training world smaller while expanding the learning opportunities for all. Web 2.0 has made life easier in many aspects. It has allowed me to work out of my home for the past 20 years and remain in contact nearly as easily as if I kept a cubicle next to my boss. It has allowed me to begin and maintain contact with my students in ways I never could. When I began my training position I had a pager. When a student would page me I would have to pull off the road, find a pay phone, return the call, get information, plan follow up. Now I can receive an email, text, message, see the context of the request, and reply immediately or as needed. Sharing of such items has been an important aspect in my job via social media, email, text – anyway the student desires.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: